How To Create A Sermon Outline

How To Create a Sermon Outline explains the ins and outs of writing a sermon outline so that your sermon has structure and flow when you preach it to your congregation.

How To Create A Sermon Outline

How To Create A Sermon Outline

Generally, a sermon has three parts - the sermon introduction, the sermon body or content and the sermon conclusion. It is important to note that the sermon outline is the sermon body - the message you are going to preach.

I usually create the sermon outline first and then add content to the sermon outline. Once I finish creating the sermon outline and writing content to sermon outline, I usually write the sermon introduction and conclusion.

There are several ways to create a sermon outline. You can create a deductive sermon outline, an inductive sermon outline or a bit of both. However, I will be showing you how to write a deductive sermon outline.

I usually create sermon outlines by developing a topic or main preaching point for the sermon outline. For example, I developed the topic Devoting Our Lives To God from Romans 12:1-2.

Once I have a topic or main preaching point, I usually look for an angle or perspective to the topic or main preaching point. I do this by asking the how, when, where, what or why questions.

With this topic from Romans 12:1-2, I asked the how question. How to devote our lives to God. In other words, we devote our lives to God by giving ourselves totally to God (12:1), by putting aside the things of this world (12:2a) and by allowing God to change our thinking (12:2b).

Sermon Outline Structure

How To Create A Sermon Outline

When I structure a sermon outline, I always keep three structural features in mind.

These three important features help me maintain cohesion and sequence in the presentation of the sermon.

In other words, the sermon outline allows the message to flow in a natural progression.

1. The Topic or Main Preaching Point

The topic or main preaching point is the subject or the big idea of your sermon. I take my time to get this absolutely right.

The topic or main preaching point should be the source of everything you talk about in your sermon.

With the topic above, the sermon outline is going to explain and expand how to devote our lives to God.

2. The Hinge Word or Key Word

To expand and explain the topic or main preaching point, I usually look for a hinge word or key word to swing all the subpoints from the topic or main preaching point. The hinge word or key word must be a plural noun.

With the topic above, I used the hinge word ways. There are three ways to devote our lives to God. The first way involves... the second way involves... and the third way involves....

When I get up to preach, the congregation know what I am going to preach on and they know what I am going to say about what I am preaching on. There is no confusion here.

3. The Subpoints and Incidental Points

The subpoints expand and explain the main preaching point. This structure allows your sermon outline to have cohesion and sequence. The subpoints flow from and interact with your main preaching point.

If you have incidental points, they should expand and explain your subpoints. In other words, they should flow from and interact with your subpoints.

Here is a sermon outline of Romans 12:1-2. As I said before, there are several ways to create sermon outlines. However, this is one way that I find easy and enjoyable for me.

There are three ways to devote our lives to God. They are:

  1. Give Yourself Totally To God (12:1)

    1. This is the right and reasonable response
    2. This is the basis for spiritual worship

  2. Put Aside The Things of The World (12:2a)
  3. Allow God To Change Your Thinking (12:2b)

    1. God wants us to see life as He sees life
    2. God wants us to know His will for our lives

Once I have created the sermon outline, I spend time writing content to the sermon outline and adding appropriate illustrations where necessary. When this is finished, I write an introduction and a conclusion to the sermon outline.

To preach this sermon outline with introduction and conclusion would take about forty (40) minutes.



Page 

copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape