Bible Sermons From Luke 5

Bible Sermons From Luke 5 provide an inductive sermon from Luke 5:1-11. This sermon follows the five stages of Lowry's Loop.


Bible Sermons From Luke 5

Bible Sermons From Luke 5 present an inductive sermon from the narrative in Luke 5:1-11 where a simple fishing expedition set the stage for Peter to get a glimpse of Jesus' majesty, which transformed his life forever.


1. We don't always like being told what to do

I believe we all struggle with being told what to do.

For some reason, we resist when someone tells us to do something.

Now, we may not always let on that we are battling with that command (whatever it may be). But in the quietness of our heart we are struggling to come to grips with being told what to do (sometimes, it can be just a little thing). A good sign of this struggle is when we walk away mumbling under our breathe. You know there is a battle going on.

I know in my late teens and early adulthood, I really struggled with being told what to do. In fact, I would do the opposite of what I was told to do.

Isn’t that amazing? I would do the very opposite of what I was told to do. However, my mother had worked me out. Instead of telling me what to do, she would ask or suggest with pleasing results.

Of course, I wasn’t a Christian those days, and I certainly didn’t understand why I was like that.

But even as Christians, we struggle with being told what to do.

Just this week I was told to do something and straight away there was resistance. It wasn’t a big deal—just a simple request. And yet, I struggled with it. There was a battle going on.

We don’t always like being told what to do.


2. It seems Peter struggled with being told what to do (5:1-5a)

Here we have Jesus speaking to a crowd of people at the Lake of Gennesaret or the Sea of Galilee.

Look at verse 1, “Now so it was, as the multitude pressed about Him to hear the word of God, that He (Jesus) stood by the Lake of Gennesaret.”

However, it seems that the crowd was large so Jesus got into a boat and move a little from the shore.

Look at verses 2 & 3, “And saw two boats standing by the lake; but the fishermen had gone from them and were washing their nets. Then He got into one of the boats, which was Simon’s, and asked him to put out a little from the land. And He sat down and taught the multitudes from the boat.”

After awhile, Jesus stopped speaking and He looks at Simon Peter and says to him, “Launch out into the deep and let down your nets for a catch.”

This time Jesus doesn’t ask Simon Peter to launch out. He tells him to launch out (v. 4)

What happened? “Well, Simon answered and said to Jesus, “Master, we have toiled all night and caught nothing” (v. 5).

You can sense resistance in Peter’s words.

I want you to imagine for a moment that you are Simon Peter.

You are a professional fisherman and someone tells you how to do your job.

I’m sure Simon Peter would have felt that Jesus was telling him how to do his job.

You can just about hear Peter protesting. “Wait a minute, Jesus. We’ve been fishing all night. We’ve caught nothing, and you ask me to fish now.” “Don’t you know the rays from the morning sun hit the water and scare the fish away? It’s foolish to go out now.”

You can sense the resistance in Peter’s words, “We’ve toiled all night and caught nothing.”

Peter struggled with being told what to do.


3. Nevertheless (in that moment of struggle) Peter conceded and got a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty (5:5b-7)

Look at verse 5 again, “But Simon answered and said to Him, ‘Master, we have toiled all night and caught nothing; nevertheless.’”

In that moment of struggle, Peter must have thought strong and hard. Maybe, in that moment of struggle, he reflected upon all that had taken place over the last few days. I would assume that Peter heard about Jesus releasing the man from an evil spirit. I would assume that Peter heard about Jesus healing the sick and diseased. I would assume again that Peter heard about Jesus healing his mother-in-law. Or maybe, in that moment of struggle, he thought about Jesus’ teaching that He was God in the flesh—the promised Messiah.

Anyhow, in that moment of struggle, he conceded. “Nevertheless (in spite of all that), at Your word I will let down the net.”

That word of concession became the turning point in Peter’s life.

When Peter let down that net he got a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty.

Look at verses 6 & 7, “And when they had done this, they caught a great number of fish, and their net was breaking. So they signaled to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both the boats, so that they began to sink.”

In spite of his professional view of the situation, Peter let down the net and got a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty.

Wow, what a catch! What a day at the lake! Peter got a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty all because he conceded to his own will and obeyed Jesus. You know, it wasn’t the greatest miracle in the Bible, but this little glimpse of Jesus’ majesty had a transforming effect upon Jesus.


4. You see, getting a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty is life transforming (5:8-11)

Look at verses 8, 9, and 10, “When Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, ‘Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord!’ For he and all who were with him were astonished at the catch of fish which they had taken’ and so also were James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon.”

When Simon Peter saw the catch, his spiritual eyes were opened and his life was transformed.

A. He acknowledged his sinfulness (5:8b)

Look at the end of verse 8, “Depart from me, for I am a sinful man.” Peter said.

B. He acknowledged Jesus’ majesty (5:8b)

Look again at verse 8, “Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord!”

C. He forsook all to follow Jesus (5:11)

Look at verse 11, “So WHEN THEY HAD brought their boats to land, they forsook all and followed him.”

When Peter saw a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty, his spiritual eyes were opened and his life was transformed.

A deductive sermon begins with the main preaching point followed by the sub-points and incidental points.

Getting a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty is life transforming.


5. So, take a step of obedience and see Jesus’ majesty transformed your life

You know, this story could have been much different if Peter did not concede to Jesus’ command.

In that moment of struggle, Peter had a choice. Do I do what I want to do or do I do as Jesus says?

If he chose the former, he would have missed out seeing Jesus at work in his life.

How many times have we missed out seeing God at work in our lives simply because we chose to do our will rather than God’s will?

You know, the Bible is full of commands. In fact, at every turn, God is there. What are we going to do? Are we going to do our will or God’s will?

Peter chose to obey and saw a glimpse of Jesus’ majesty and his life was transformed.

Will you obey and see a glimpse of Jesus' transforming majesty in your life?



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